Alarming: Grade 6 students promoted to high school despite not being able to read

Grade 6 students promoted to high school despite not being able to read

Grade 6 students promoted to high school despite not being able to read is one problem in education. This is one of the struggles that the secondary schools are facing. Many junior high school teachers are complaining why these students progress. Those teachers that handle the First Year High School of the freshmen have a lot to do in double effort for them. English teachers that handle freshmen students complain the most.

What could actually be the root of this scenario? The problem about Grade 6 students promoted to high school despite not being able to read may have roots. To note that way back in the 80’s and 90’s, students are good readers. I am a product of that era where teachers are stricter and firm in their management. It was then that students are more studious and focused on their studies. It was then that students were afraid to get failing grades since it means taking back the subject. There may be students who were slow in reading but at least, at the end of the school year, they manage to advance. I remembered I have a male classmate way back in Grade 2, he was struggling with pronouncing the words. He was too shy and he can’t read a sentence without the teacher guiding. It was hard for him but as the days went on, he survived. Now, he is a professional staff in a superb hospital.

To compare the previous years and our present educational system, I can say that there is much work to do. DepEd should take immediate action on this problem. This will affect the flow and progress of education in our country. There are somehow notable aspects that I have to pinpoint that may be the cause of this problem:

  • The duties and responsibilities of teachers at present are much heavier compared before. In the previous decades, teachers can focus on the students only and the subject they taught. For some reasons, it isn’t the case now. Teachers at present have to deal with many ancillary and extra works rather than teach. More paperworks, reports, surveys, data gathering and so on, these add to the workload. This contributes a factor to the problem.
  • The presence of gadgets and internet has a huge impact on the learning of the students. Technology is anywhere and the students pay more attention to it. They neglect their studies because of the fun they feel with these technologies.
  • Parents at present are dependent on the teachers alone when it comes to learning. In the past decades, the parents are hands-on. Simple words taught at home can help big timed to the development of the learner. I remembered my mother prepared a stick and a small “abakada” chart pasted on our wall for me to review.
  • The education system today favors the students the most. Now, the students are not afraid because of the “no student left behind” policy. When a student failed to perform his/her duties at school, failure should be the consequence. It isn’t the case today though. Teachers can no longer discipline the students the way it was.
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These may be the roots why Grade 6 students promoted to high school despite not being able to read. In this case, we need the full cooperation of the parents, the teachers, and of course DepEd in general. Students learn the basics from their elementary, so it is best to train them while they are young. Reading is very important in the secondary stage. Teachers will no longer go back to basics and can go with their lessons without worries. – Clea | Helpline PH

1 thought on “Alarming: Grade 6 students promoted to high school despite not being able to read”

  1. Geraldine Estomata Tamarion

    No Student left behind policy,agree naman po ako,sa akin lang as a newbie teacher ,kaelangan natin na e follow up ang students,kung di makontak sa Cp or Social media,puntahan talaga sa kanilang bahay para malaman natin kung anong problema nila

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